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  • rbr2garcia

    How to Discover and Monitor Bad Backlinks

    1 weeks agoReply
    Identifying bad backlinks has become easier over the past few years with better tool sets, bigger link indexes, and increased knowledge, but for many in our industry it's still crudely implemented. While the ideal scenario would be to have a professional poring over your link profile and combing each link one-by-one for concerns, for many webmasters that's just too expensive (and, frankly, overkill).

    I'm going to walk through a simple methodology using Link Explorer and Excel (although you could do this with Google Sheets just as easily) to combine together the power of Moz Link Explorer, Keyword Explorer Lists, and finally Link Lists to do a comprehensive link audit.

    The basics

    There are several components involved in determining whether a link is "bad" and should potentially be removed. Ultimately, we want to be able to measure the riskiness of the link (how likely is Google to flag the link as manipulative and how much do we depend on the link for value). Let me address three common factors used by SEOs to determine this score:

    Trust metrics:

    There are a handful of metrics in our industry that are readily available to help point out concerning backlinks. The two that come to mind most often are Moz Spam Score and Majestic Trust Flow (or, better yet, the difference between Citation Flow and Trust Flow). These two scores actually work quite differently. Moz's Spam Score predicts the likelihood a domain is banned or penalized based on certain site features. Majestic Trust Flow determines the trustworthiness of a domain or page based on the quality of links pointing to it. While calculated quite differently, the goal is to help webmasters identify which sites are trustworthy and which are not. However, while these are a good starting point, they aren't sufficient on their own to give you a clear picture of whether a link is good or bad.

    Anchor text manipulation:

    One of the first things an SEO learns is that using valuable anchor text can help increase your rankings. The very next thing they learn is that using valuable anchor text can bring on a penalty. The reason for this is pretty clear: the likelihood a webmaster will give you valuable anchor text out of the goodness of their heart is very rare, so over-optimization sticks out like a sore thumb. So, how do we measure anchor text manipulation? If we look at anchor text with our own eyes, this seems to be rather intuitive, but there's a better way to do it in an automated, at-scale fashion that will allow us to better judge links.

    Low authority:

    Finally, low-authority links — especially when you would expect higher authority based on the domain — are concerning. A good link should come from an internally well-linked page on a site. If the difference between the Domain Authority and Page Authority is very high, it can be a concern. It isn't a strong signal, but it is one worth looking at. This is especially obvious in certain types of spam, like paginated comment spam or forum profile spam.

    Source Link: https://moz.com/blog/bad-backlink-analys..
  • rbr2garcia

    How Google Autocomplete Works in Search

    3 weeks agoReply
    1 Like
    How Google Autocomplete Works in Search

    Do you know why Google's autocomplete sometimes delivers irrelevant predictions and how to report these errors? Danny Sullivan explains this interesting search feature from A-Z.

    Autocomplete is a feature within Google Search designed to make it faster to complete searches that you’re beginning to type. In this post—the second in a series that goes behind-the-scenes about Google Search—we’ll explore when, where and how autocomplete works.

    Using autocomplete

    Autocomplete is available most anywhere you find a Google search box, including the Google home page, the Google app for iOS and Android, the quick search box from within Android and the “Omnibox” address bar within Chrome.

    In the example above, you can see that typing the letters “san f” brings up predictions such as “san francisco weather” or “san fernando mission,” making it easy to finish entering your search on these topics without typing all the letters.

    Sometimes, we’ll also help you complete individual words and phrases.

    Read More Info Here
    blog.google/products/search/how-google-a..
  • rbr2garcia

    14 Essential Tips for Improving Your Web Design

    3 months agoReply
    WEBSITE DESIGN | USER EXPERIENCE DESIGN | RESPONSIVE DESIGN

    Within 5 seconds of landing on your website, can your visitors determine what your company does? Could users easily navigate to the blog if they need to? Is the layout of your pricing easy to understand? Do you have an extremely high bounce rate?

    If you're finding yourself answering ‘no’ to these questions, it might be time to take a hard look at the way you’ve been designing and optimizing your website.

    A website can’t simply succeed by excelling in limited aspects (such as solely design or content). It needs to have a design that feeds into your website's user experience, functionality, and appropriately complements your content.

    Your website also needs to clearly communicate with your audience what you do, why you do it, and who you do it for. It's easy to get caught up with how great you are as a business, that you forget to make sure we are addressing core concerns your audience has first and foremost.

    So, what do you need to know to start improving your web design?

    To answer that, here are 14 website tips to ensure that you're going in the right direction in your redesign and are assuring you aren't turning visitors away.

    14 Tips for Improving Your Web Design

    1. Have a Plan

    Don't just start designing your website. To ensure that your website is effectively meeting the needs of your visitors you need to map out your buyer's journey from the first time they visit your website to the moment they become a customer.

    What pages are they going to view, what content are they going to read, and what offers are they going to convert on? Understanding this will help you design a site that helps nurture leads through the sales funnel.

    You want to design your website for the next step, not the final step. It's all about answering the right questions in the right order. This might be where context comes into play. Take what you already know about your current customers (or even interview them) and research how they went from a visitor to a customer. Then, use this data to map out your strategy.

    2. Remove the Following From Your Website

    Certain elements on your website are going to detract from the value and message you're trying to convey. Complicated animations, content that’s too long, stocky website images are just a few factors on the list.

    With an audience that only has an attention span of 8 seconds, you need to create a first impression that easily gets the main points across. This should be done with short, powerful sections of content and applicable photographs/icons that are sectioned off by clear and concise headers.

    If you’ve got those right, then review it and make sure it doesn’t contain jargon or ambiguous terminology. It only serves to muddy your content and confuse your users.

    Some words to avoid include next generation, flexible, robust, scalable, easy to use, cutting edge, groundbreaking, best-of-breed, mission critical, innovative ... those are all words that have over used by hundreds if not thousands of companies and don’t make your content any more appealing.

    Read full article here: impactbnd.com/blog/tips-for-improving-yo..
  • rbr2garcia

    SEO Myth Busting: 13 Biggest SEO Myths

    9 months agoReply
    1 Like
    SEO, as any area of our life, is swarming with myths and misconceptions. They are usually born out of ignorance, fear, and hunt for quick results. It is like a variety of diet advice — “cut entirely on the food, just eat one weird vegetable three times a day". Yes, you might lose weight. But will it last? Will you be happy in the process? You tell me.

    Same here. People are prone to choose quicker methods. Well, life is too short. Who needs all those long-term results. But we surely need an efficient outcome. Plus, the damage after a quick SEO campaign based on the general misconceptions will take way more time to recover from than applying a well-thought SEO procedure.

    However, while people continue to go for quick results and no research, these myths will never cease to exist. What you need is to recognize them as such and treat any information with caution. Knowledge is power. Thorough knowledge is indestructible!

    I made a compilation of the most popular myths (that made up a nice number of 13) and tried to debunk them once and forever (or at least for some time). Let's see whether we are on the same side, and if not, let's check whether I can change your mind.

    RankBrain, semantic search, AMP, and mobile-first are among the top buzz words of the past twelve months. Penguin and Panda have become smarter and are now part of the core algorithm.

    So, to help you catch the wind and brush up your SEO skills, I've prepared a list of recommendations SEOs should focus on right now.

    Contents
    1. SEO is a fraud
    2. SEO is all shenanigans
    3. Google is at war with SEO
    4. One-time SEO effort is enough
    5. Link building is dangerous
    6. CTR is out of the game
    7. Keyword research is a waste of time
    8. Social signals are of no SEO value
    9. Guest blogging is obsolete
    10. High paid rankings = High organic rankings
    11. Keyword-optimized anchor text is bad for your SEO
    12. Separate pages for every keyword is a key to success
    13. SEO is dead

    Read full article here: link-assistant.com/news/13-biggest-seo-m..

    #SEOisdead
    #CTRisoutofthegame
    #guestbloggingisobsolete
    #GooglewarwithSEO
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