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  • rbr2garcia

    SEO Myth Busting: 13 Biggest SEO Myths

    3 months agoReply
    1 Like
    SEO, as any area of our life, is swarming with myths and misconceptions. They are usually born out of ignorance, fear, and hunt for quick results. It is like a variety of diet advice — “cut entirely on the food, just eat one weird vegetable three times a day". Yes, you might lose weight. But will it last? Will you be happy in the process? You tell me.

    Same here. People are prone to choose quicker methods. Well, life is too short. Who needs all those long-term results. But we surely need an efficient outcome. Plus, the damage after a quick SEO campaign based on the general misconceptions will take way more time to recover from than applying a well-thought SEO procedure.

    However, while people continue to go for quick results and no research, these myths will never cease to exist. What you need is to recognize them as such and treat any information with caution. Knowledge is power. Thorough knowledge is indestructible!

    I made a compilation of the most popular myths (that made up a nice number of 13) and tried to debunk them once and forever (or at least for some time). Let's see whether we are on the same side, and if not, let's check whether I can change your mind.

    RankBrain, semantic search, AMP, and mobile-first are among the top buzz words of the past twelve months. Penguin and Panda have become smarter and are now part of the core algorithm.

    So, to help you catch the wind and brush up your SEO skills, I've prepared a list of recommendations SEOs should focus on right now.

    Contents
    1. SEO is a fraud
    2. SEO is all shenanigans
    3. Google is at war with SEO
    4. One-time SEO effort is enough
    5. Link building is dangerous
    6. CTR is out of the game
    7. Keyword research is a waste of time
    8. Social signals are of no SEO value
    9. Guest blogging is obsolete
    10. High paid rankings = High organic rankings
    11. Keyword-optimized anchor text is bad for your SEO
    12. Separate pages for every keyword is a key to success
    13. SEO is dead

    Read full article here: link-assistant.com/news/13-biggest-seo-m..

    #SEOisdead
    #CTRisoutofthegame
    #guestbloggingisobsolete
    #GooglewarwithSEO
  • rbr2garcia

    11 Lessons Learned from Failed Link Building Campaigns

    4 months agoReply
    We’ve created more than 800 content campaigns at Fractl over the years, and we’d be lying if we told you every single one was a hit.

    The Internet is a finicky place. You can’t predict with 100% accuracy if your content will perform well. Sometimes what we think is going to do OK ends up being a massive hit. And there have been a few instances where we’d expect a campaign to be a huge success but it went on to garner lackluster results.

    While you can’t control the whims of the Internet, you can avoid or include certain things in your content to help your chances of success. Through careful analysis we’ve pinpointed which factors tend to create high-performing content. Similarly, we’ve identified trends among our content that didn’t quite hit the mark.

    In this this post, I’ll share our most valuable lessons we learned from content flops. Bear in mind this advice applies if you’re using content to earn links and press pickups, which is what the majority of the content we create at Fractl aims to do.

    1. There’s such a thing as too much data.

    For content involving a lot of data, it can be tempting to publish every single data point you collect.

    A good example of this is surveying. We’ve fallen down the rabbit hole of not only sharing all of the data we’ve collected in a survey, but also segmenting the data out by demographics — regardless of whether or not all of that data is super compelling. While this can give publishers a large volume of potential angles to choose from, the result is often unfocused content lacking a cohesive narrative.

    Only include the most insightful, interesting data points in your content, even if that means tossing aside most of the data you’ve gathered.

    One example of this was a survey we did for a home security client where we asked people about stalker-ish behaviors they’d committed. The juiciest survey data (like 1 in 5 respondents had created a fake social account to spy on someone — yikes!) ended up getting buried because we included every data point from the survey, some of which wasn’t so interesting. Had we trimmed down the content to only the most shocking findings, it probably would have performed far better.

    Furthermore, the more data you include, the more time it takes for a publisher to wade through it. As one journalist told us after we sent over an epic amount of data: “Long story short, this will take too much time.”

    Consider this: It shouldn’t take a publisher more than 10 seconds of looking at your project to grasp the most meaningful data points. If they can’t quickly understand that, how will their readers?

    2. Turning published data into something cool doesn't always yield links.

    If you’re going to use data that’s already been reported on, you better have a new spin or finding to present. Journalists don't want to cover the same stats they have already covered.

    A great example of this is a project we created about the reasons startups fail. The majority of the data we used came from CB Insights’ startup post mortems list, which had performed really well for them. (As of the time I’m writing this, according to Open Site Explorer it has 197 linking root domains from sites including BBC, Business Insider, Fortune, Vox, CNBC, and Entrepreneur — impressive!)

    It worked well once, so it should work again if we repackage it into a new format, right?

    We used the startups featured on the CB Insights list, added in a handful of additional startups, and created a sexy-looking interactive node map that grouped together startups according to the primary reasons they went under.

    While the content didn’t end up being a failure (we got it picked up by Quartz, woo!), it definitely didn’t live up to the expectations we had for it.

    Read full article here: https://moz.com/blog/lessons-from-failed..
  • rbr2garcia

    How Google's New Project Owl Update Can Affect Brands

    7 months agoReply
    Last week Google announced they would be implementing changes in an effort to combat inaccurate information and hateful search results from their search engine. In this article I'll cover the possible pros and cons of this update and how it can affect brands.

    What is Project Owl and how it works

    Project Owl is Google's update gives users the ability to report information they may deem inappropriate, inaccurate or offensive.
    Let's see how it works:

    1 A new link to a feedback form will appear underneath Google's suggested searches;
    2 A new link to a feedback form will appear underneath "Featured Snippets;"

    These changes have been implemented after Google has been scrutinized for sharing some questionable content. In December of 2016 the number one result for the search query "did the Holocaust happen" was linked to a pro-Nazi site. Other missteps include featuring Breitbart for a top science or news story regarding the Great Barrier Reef.

    Project Owl is Google's reaction to combatting these problematic results. Whether it's inaccurate information or offensive search queries, Google wants to ensure that what we receive is reliable and relevant information.

    Read full article here: https://serpstat.com/blog/how-googles-ne..
  • rbr2garcia

    Local SEO Spam Tactics Are Working: How You Can Fight Back

    9 months agoReply
    For years, I've been saying that if you have a problem with spammers in local results, you can just wait it out. I mean, if Google cared about removing spam and punishing those who are regular spammers we'd see them removed fast and often, right?

    While there are instances where spam has been removed, it seems these are not fast fixes, permanent fixes, or even very common. In fact, they seem few and far between. So today I’m changing my tune a bit to call more attention to the spam issues people employ that violate Google My Business terms and yet continue to win in the SERPs.

    The problems are rampant and blatant. I've heard and seen many instances of legitimate businesses changing their names just to rank better and faster for their keywords.

    Another problem is that Google is shutting down MapMaker at the end of March. Edits will still be allowed, but they'll need to be made through Google Maps.

    If Google is serious about rewarding brands in local search, they need to encourage it through their local search algorithms.

    For some people, it’s gotten so bad that they’re actually suing Google. On January 13, 2017, for instance, a group of fourteen locksmiths sued Google, Yahoo, and Bing over fake spam listings, as reported by Joy Hawkins.

    While some changes — like the Possum update — seemed to have a positive impact overall, root problems (such as multiple business listings) and many other issues still exist in the local search ecosystem.

    Read full article here: https://moz.com/blog/local-seo-spam-tact..
  • rbr2garcia

    How to Use Hosted Blog Platforms for SEO & Content Distribution

    2 years agoReply
    Where do you host your content? Is it on your own site, or on third-party platforms like Medium and LinkedIn? If you're not yet thinking about the ramifications of using hosted blog platforms for your content versus your own site, now's your chance to start. In this week's Whiteboard Friday, Rand explores the boons and pitfalls of using outside websites to distribute and share your content.

    Video Transcription

    Howdy, Moz ( https://moz.com/blog/use-hosted-blog-pla.. ) fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week we're going to chat a little bit about blog platforms, places like Medium, Svbtle — that's Svbtle with a V instead of a U — Tumblr, LinkedIn, places where essentially you've got a hosted blog platform, a hosted content platform. It's someone else's network. You don't have to set up your own website, but at the same time you are contributing content to their site.

    This has become really popular, I think. Look, Medium and LinkedIn are really the two big ones where a lot of folks are contributing these days. LinkedIn very B2B focused, Medium very startup, and new media as well as new creative-focused.

    So I think, because of the rise of these things, we're seeing a lot of people ask themselves, "Should I create my own content platform? Do I need to build a WordPress hosted subfolder on my website? Or can I just use Medium because it has all these advantages, right?" Well, let me try and answer those questions for you today.
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