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    Google Reduced Fifty Percent of Android Malwares

    As stated by Corliss Tech Review Group, a malware is a type of software that is specifically created to gain access or damage user’s sensitive data.

    Android has long been seen as vulnerable to malware because it is an open platform and several devices run older versions of the mobile operating system. Android is also one of the world’s most popular mobile platform where it powers hundreds of millions of mobile devices in more than 190 countries worldwide, but its popularity has also made it a magnet for malwares based on Corliss Tech Review Group.

    In the past year, Google claims that malware infections on Android devices have been reduced in half after notable developments and security upgrades for mobile phones such as improved encryption and better detection tools for malware.

    According to a blog post of Google’s chief security engineer, Adrian Ludwig, the overall worldwide percentage of possibly harmful applications installed are decreased by almost fifty percent during the first and the fourth quarter of the year. Android devices in use worldwide which are over 1 billion have their devices protected by security through Google Play wherein it conducts two hundred million security scans every day and less than 1% of the devices had potentially harmful applications installed in 2014.

    Google also states that the rate of possibly malicious applications installed on devices which only use Google Play apps was less than 0.15%.

    Ludwig also ensured that Android is a safe place and they are still making improvements to enhance protections for Android devices wherein they are being more hands-on in reviewing applications for all types of policy violations within Google Play and they have also increased their efforts to increase security for specific higher-risk devices and regions outside of Google Play.
  • Franchezcamine3

    The Corliss Group Latest Tech Review: How secure are payment technologies?

    New payment technologies have the potential to make shopping online and in store more secure, but banks, tech companies and shops must first move to upgrade their systems efficiently and correctly, say cyber safety experts.

    The payments industry is working to make it faster and more convenient to move money around. Yet, if implemented wrongly, this can make life easier for hackers too, the security experts say.

    “Many of these evolutionary or revolutionary changes have been driven by convenience and ease of use, and often accepting a certain amount of risk,” says Amit Mital, chief technology officer of security firm Symantec.

    Making the purchase of goods more secure is a priority for retailers, banks and payment companies. In the US, where payment card technology is less sophisticated than in Europe, retailers have recently been hit by massive data breaches, in which hackers have been able to steal tens of millions of customers’ card and personal data.

    The highest-profile technology to hit the market is Apple Pay, which works with the iPhone 6s. It lets shoppers store their credit card information on their iPhone and pay for goods by tapping the phone on an in-store receiver. Because of a technology called “tokenisation” experts say it is more secure than current card systems.
  • Franchezcamine3

    The Corliss Group Latest Tech Review: Security Experts Offer Online Shopping Tips

    As Americans spend billions on holiday shopping this month, online security experts say a little caution can go a long way when it comes to avoiding identity theft.

    “In general online shopping is good. It’s safe for the most part, but it’s the safest when you initiate the contact, when you log onto a known website,” said Rick Avery, president of Boston-based Securitas Security Systems.

    Directly visiting trusted, reputable online retailers is just one way to attempt to avoid the cyber criminals who try to steal sensitive information from vulnerable computers and unsuspecting consumers.

    “There is a risk in commerce …” said Sam Ransbotham, an information systems professor at Boston College. “There is also a risk from walking around with a wad of cash. We’ve got years and years of experience walking around with wads of cash that we just don’t have with these newer mechanisms.”

    Purchases at brick-and-mortar stores aren’t immune to data breaches either. Last year, hackers stole data from 40 million credit cards from Target, while cyber thieves got information from 56 million credit cards from Home Depot earlier this year.

    To reduce the chances of fraud, Avery advises that shoppers be wary of offers sent via email. Criminals, he said, may send legitimate-looking emails that appear to be from online merchants or banks. Rather than clicking on a link in an email, he recommends directly typing the website address into your browser.

    “One of the most dangerous ways people get involved with credit card fraud or theft on the Internet is they get emailed a link offering 50 percent off, or saying it’s from the bank, and it’s actually a false website made to look like the authentic website,” he said.

    Cyber criminals can use fraudulent websites to gather financial information from a person or install malware on their computers.

    “If you’re shopping around and find an extra, extra really good deal, that might be the online equivalent to buying cheap speakers out of the back of a truck,” Ransbotham said. “If it’s too good to be true, it is.”

    Avery also recommends using credit cards or one-time use credit cards instead of debit cards.

    “Some banks have protections on a debit card, but not all do at the point of an ATM,” Avery said. “Usually, your debit card is tied to your other banking accounts, and it’s a lot more difficult to get your money back. It may be weeks before you get your money back.”

    In some cases, a victim might never get that money back.
  • Franchezcamine3

    Corliss Tech Review Group: Google Glass barely alive

    Two years ago, Google has hyped its Glasses device as the greatest thing since sliced bread -- and for a moment, many of us believed it.

    During its launch, there was much enthusiasm on the part of the consumers and developers but now people seemed to be losing interest. (Whether that's because of the $1,500 price tag or the fact that you can't really find a place to buy it from remains unknown.)

    While it may still sound supercool to geeks, Glass might not even reach the hands of the general public as developers are jumping out of the bandwagon. Some of them have felt the lack of support from Google, especially since an official public launch date is yet to be set. When Glass became available for developers in 2012, 10,000 units were reportedly sold. Then last year, it became available to tech lovers and media people but as of now, there's no news when it would become commercially available.

    "It's not a big enough platform to play on seriously," said the founder of Normative Design Matthew Milan who discontinued their Glass app supposed to target fitness buffs.

    According to Corliss Tech Review Group, out of more than a dozen Glass app developers, 9 have already put their efforts on hold owing to the limitations of the gadget and perceived lack of customers. Meanwhile, 3 of them have instead switched their focus on developing software for businesses.

    "If there was 200 million Google Glasses sold, it would be a different perspective. There's no market at this point," said Tom Frencel, CEO of a game developer firm that held back its efforts to make a Glass game.

    What's more, in the past 6 months, a number of Google employees responsible for the Glass development have reportedly left. Also, the Glass Collective, a funding consortium by Google Ventures has invested in only 3 startups this year and has taken down its website without notice. A spokesperson from Google Ventures said that the reason for the website closure is for entrepreneurs to come to them directly.

    Google insists it's still committed to developing Glass. Chris O'Neill, its head of business ops said, "We are completely energized as ever about the opportunity that wearable and Glass in particular represent. We are as committed as ever to a consumer launch. That is going to take time and we are not going to launch this product until it's absolutely ready."

    The formerly proud "Explorers" who go around the streets touting their Glasses are now getting flak for being "Glassholes". After all, no one really wants such evident threat to privacy hanging around in obvious, or obscure, places. In fact, someone from Google admitted himself that Glass is a perfect example of privacy issues concerning wearable devices.

    Experts from Corliss Tech Review Group have already predicted that it's a tall order for Glass to be a mass-market gadget. It's more likely to go down the road of Segway; a supposedly cool invention that ended up being used only in professional and industrial settings.

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  • Franchezcamine3

    The Corliss Group Latest Tech Review: New Algorithm Finds the Most Beautiful

    The way we navigate in cities has been revolutionized in the last few years by the advent of GPS mapping programs. Enter your start and end location and these will give you the shortest route from A to B.

    That’s usually the best bet when driving, but walking is a different matter. Often, pedestrians want the quietest route or the most beautiful but if they turn to a mapping application, they’ll get little help.

    That could change now thanks to the work of Daniele Quercia at Yahoo Labs in Barcelona, Spain, and a couple of pals. These guys have worked out how to measure the “beauty” of specific locations within cities and then designed an algorithm that automatically chooses a route between two locations in a way that maximizes the beauty along it. “The goal of this work is to automatically suggest routes that are not only short but also emotionally pleasant,” they say.

    Quercia and co begin by creating a database of images of various parts of the center of London taken from Google Street View and Geograph, both of which have reasonably consistent standards of images. They then crowdsourced opinions about the beauty of each location using a website called UrbanGems.org.

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