TO PLAY AMIDST THE COBBLES

Four young boys are accused with robbery. one of them with murder, Hanging in Britain was still prevalent at that time. Can one of them escape the hangman's noose?'
Ruby White the petite honey blonde who works in a chemist shop spends her lunch break reading poetry in the local library. it is there that she meets Richard Llewellyn Shaw a writer and poet from Wales who has come to the North East to write a book. A relationship develops even though he is eight years her senior.
Then there is Jessie Longworth who has been saddled with looking after her father who is in the early stages of dementia. She is unable to cope with looking after her father, and her family and asks her brother Edward if he will take her father for a while. Joe Corder is an ex-dock worker. He worked hard all his life and gives his son his savings to help him start his own business. He meets Elizabeth who comes from a well to do family who all look down on Jessie and her father. She will not have him in her home.

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 Driving to Hill Crest House George Longworth dropped his wife and father in law off. She took his case from the boot then walked to the main entrance where she was greeted by a nice young lady called Olive Cooke.

Hello Mr Corder how are you today?’

Mr Corder smiled at the young woman then asked if they served tea.’

“Yes Mr Corder, please come through to the lounge and you can meet the other residents.

Jessie went in with him and the place seemed fine. It was clean, although she could smell something distinctive but she was at a loss to remember what it was. There were five women and four men in the lounge.’

“We have twelve residents here Mrs Longworth. Olive Cooke went around introducing Joe to everyone and when they got to the last man he looked at Joe then said “remember me Joe.’

Joe looked at him for a second then said it’s Jackie, isn’t it.’

Yes Joe, Jackie Waver we worked together about forty odd years ago.’

Aye down at the Docks. Joe sat next to his former work friend and they were in deep conversation so Jessie kissed her father then thanked Mrs Cooke.

“I think he’s going to be fine here Mrs Longworth. It makes a lot of difference if they know someone here.’

“I will come at the weekend to see him if that is alright.’

“Of course; you can come here anytime you wish.’ You do not need an appointment.’

“Thank you,’ I will go then.’

Jessie looked over to see her father still talking away.’ She slipped out the main door with a tear in her eye. There was some finality about leaving her father at Hill Crest house knowing that the next time he would be moving would be to Preston Cemetery.

She sat next to her husband in the front seat of the car not looking back because she would have ran back in and took her father back home with her.

“Are you alright love, said George as he reached over and took hold of her hand.

“Yes she sighed, let’s go home

George drove back to the house in relative silence; when she got out of the car she went into the house ran to her bedroom and broke down. It was the hardest thing she’d ever done in her life. Jessie felt as though she had abandoned her own father. One thing was certain she could not have carried on looking after her dad on her own. It was just too much. She kept on telling herself that to reassure herself in her own mind that she had done the right thing.

Shortly after George brought her a cup of tea for her then sat on the bed next to her.

“It’s going to feel strange in here without dad.’

“I know that Jess but you will get used to it. We now have some time to ourselves we could go out tonight if you like.’

“Not tonight George, let me get used to the idea first.’

“Our Mark is going to miss him terribly too.’

“Like us he will get used to it after a while love.’ Come on lets go back into the parlour.’ I’ll cook something nice for our tea what do you say.’

“It’s alright George; I will cook for us it will help me take my mind off dad for a while’

Jessie got up from the bed then walked along the passage and into the parlour the chair where her father used to sit stood empty.

She looked at a photo of her father in his younger days standing in the shipyard with a bow torch in his hand and a protective visor lifted up on his head.

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