The Troubles

"The Troubles " the story is set in Belfast and the North East in 1969.
Seamus Webster and his family flee the riots in Belfast and come to live on Barnstaple Road in North Shields - where he takes up work as a crane driver in Smith's Docks his wife Annie finds a job in the Co-op in Whitley Bay - Seamus is good at DIY and gets lots of work decorating or fitting out new kitchens for people. His father Michael is serving a very long sentence when he is implicated in a
bombing of an army base- his skills as a bomb maker have been passed down to his oldest son and Stephen Mcgill is on the look -out for him as a bombing campaign has begun on mainland Britain. Newcastle has been chosen as the target - can Seamus avoid getting mixed up in this. Read what happens in this tense thriller.

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5. 5

“No way Da’ I’m never getting married.’

“We all say that don’t we Annie.’

“We do; but look at us twenty years down the line; married with two mouths to feed.’

Liam came into the kitten and sat on the wooden seat; the dining area was small but was large enough to fit up to six people at a squeeze.

The cooker had been moved into the wash room by Seamus to make more room.

In the wash room was the fridge, cooker, washing machine, and spin drier. On the walls were all the tools and storage boxes for screws, nails, bolts, brackets, in fact Seamus never threw anything away that could be either used or adapted.

He cut into his sausage then asked his son what he’d been doing that day in school.’

“Just the usual Da,’ you know reading, writing, and arithmetic.’

Well stick in won’t you, I mean I want you to learn a good trade when you leave school.’

“I’m wallpapering over at Andy Slater’s house after my dinner.’

“What are you grafting’ again.’

“Well someone has got to bring money in; the bills have to be paid you know.’

“These two are not workin’ so we have to make enough so that they can get a good education.’

“I want to play professional rugby Da’

“Rugby is it; over my dead body said Annie; you will get yourself to university and learn a proper trade like engineering.’

“What about you Brenda have you plans on what you are going to do?’

Yes’ I want to be a doctor.’

“A doctor be Jesus, said Seamus; now that would be something I tell you that.’

“Now I would be mighty proud to say that we have a doctor in this house.’

Pour me a cup of tea would you love said Seamus as he mopped up the gravy with his Yorkshire pudding.’

Annie stood up and went to the cupboards that her husband had made and fitted all around so that she had space. She took the mugs down and filled each one from the big teapot. Her husband liked his tea and drank several cups throughout the day. He went to the canteen at mid morning and at lunch time and asked Mary Hamilton to fill up his large thermos full of hot tea. He didn’t use milk; he just spooned in some sugar and stirred it. There was usually enough to see him through the day. From over one hundred and twenty feet above the ground Seamus was able to see right around the yard and over the river Tyne to South Shields and as far as Newcastle. On a clear day he could make out Penshaw Monument.

He saw the ships and boats come and go as he lifted and transported lumps of steel ready to be welded into place. The coal barges and Dredgers travelled up and down all day long. He liked his job; even though he was mostly on his own. There was radio contact from the ground who told him what and when it was needed. The job was never boring as he was like an artist painting a different picture from a canvas each time. The only time he had company was at lunch time when he sat with Andy Slater and the plater’s. He called him “Slater the plater.” The name stuck and it wasn’t long before everyone knew Andy by his nick name. They were a good bunch of lads and they never talked about the troubles in Ireland even though they knew he was from Belfast.

Politics was a no- no subject; so they discussed sex, women, told jokes, played jokes on fellow work mates; then talked about their kids. The food was good from the canteen and Mary who had taken a liking to the big Irishman made sure whatever he had there was plenty of it.’ Seamus was a good looking man his hair was longer than 

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