The Outcasts.

All school have ‘social groups’ no matter where they are, some more obvious than others and some are barely noticeable. The key ones I’ve heard of are the ‘populars’, the ‘emos’, the ‘geeks/nerds’ and sometimes you just don’t fit into one at all. You become a social outcast. The worst thing is, it can ruin your whole social status as well lasting up to when you get a job or even retire. It is all about connections everyone would tell you, if you know the right people you’ll get the right things. Everyone is so selective I guess, they all have a goal or dream of what they want even if they are unaware of it themselves.

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1. Just the start

All school have ‘social groups’ no matter where they are, some more obvious than others and some are barely noticeable. The key ones I’ve heard of are the ‘populars’, the ‘emos’, the ‘geeks/nerds’ and sometimes you just don’t fit into one at all. You become a social outcast. The worst thing is, it can ruin your whole social status as well lasting up to when you get a job or even retire. It is all about connections everyone would tell you, if you know the right people you’ll get the right things. Everyone is so selective I guess, they all have a goal or dream of what they want even if they are unaware of it themselves. You see, my family were the most well-known family in our county my mother and father both rolling in money since a young age. I guess you could call me lucky but I can tell you it’s the exact opposite. It can destroy everything if one simple thing doesn’t go your way. My father was the boss of a massive insurance company in the states and my mother making her own living as an author and chef. They would always be holding social events and what not, intending to make their popularity grow even further (if that was possible). I was never one to enjoy them sort of events, I was complete opposite to my parents I liked privacy and not having to be fake to fit in. they are had this image in their mind that I was a popular, rich daughter they had always dreamed of. I wasn’t! You might call me an outcast, let me explain. You see at school I was once a popular “living the dream” with all the fake Barbie dolls and jerks by the thousands. It was great at first always going to parties, drinking, smoking the lot. Trust me; it is not all it turns out to be. ‘Fake’ is an understatement of how to describe the girls, dressed head to toe in basically nothing at all. Showing as much flesh as society accepts, prancing around in the latest designer collections and they constantly used boys for their own gain. Because of my parents status they believed I was one of them and welcomed me open-armed but I wasn’t, I never drank and hooked up with random boys at parties, I didn’t see the fun in it. You may call me a ‘goody-toe shoes’, a ‘snob’ and I can tell you I’ve heard them all so keep them coming, aye.

Then, I made one mistake sending me to rock bottom of the social status, leaving me with the social outcast. What are the times I was appalled with but here I am happier than I ever have been with the populars.  It’s amazing really; I fell from the queen of high school to the scrap heap in a mere few hours. It makes me laugh every time I explain the story I mean who wouldn’t? It was a annual party held at Michaela’s house (a popular with a similar status than mine with her parents being rich with inheritance) the alcohol was flowing strongly through the house and everyone smoking whatever they could put their hands on.  Me? I was alone with my own thoughts and a bottle of Pepsi max; this is how I normally spent parties or looking after people puking up their guts. Wow classy! All the girls were wearing dresses that were too tight and too short, clinging to their skeleton like body. I was wearing high-waisted hot pants with legging and a band top (yes, very different I know). It came to about ten o’clock the time in which I try to sneak out unnoticed and head home to my parents making some excuse why I was home early that was until it was declared that we would be taking part in ‘seven minutes of heaven’… a game you must of heard of, if not basically a girl and a boy go into a cupboard or something similar and have seven minutes to do as they please with each other. Blah. I joined the group and regretted it straight away as my name was called for the seven minutes of hell with a boy who tried to get with me and four other girls at the same time last year. My luck seriously couldn’t get any worse, I’m not joking I kept thinking as I was pulled into the cupboard by the boy who I couldn’t remember the name of now and he was off his head. I tried to prevent him shutting the door but he didn’t listen as he only had one thing on his mind. I tried everything to get out of his tight grasp as he tried taking my clothes off, “please stop,” I pleaded not caring how pathetic I must of sounded. I just wanted to get out of here and back to my own bed away from the drunken boys and girls, trying to use me every second. The boy went to kiss me as the cupboard flung open I jumped out landing into someone’s arms as tears began to stream down my face.  I had no idea who I was crying into but they lead me away from the group and all their banter and sniggering upstairs to a room. I pulled away recognizing the boy before me, Michaela’s outcast brother Robbie. I smiled at him and thanked him as he passed me a tissue, comforting me as I tried to straight myself up. “I’m so sorry about that oath trying to use you; I should never have agreed to let Michaela have a party. I’m sorry,” Robbie announced I was so confused, I barely knew him but here he stood in front of me holding me close, comforting me and blaming his self for the drunks downstairs. I just shook my head, “it’s really not your fault. I normally try to stay out of things like that, only reason I’m here is for my parents. They believe I am massively popular which I really am not.” I replied as he just sighed.
“Trust me; it’s better to be an outcast.” He told me sternly and from that moment I realised. I would rather hang round with people like Robbie who took care of you when in trouble than people downstairs who just sniggered at me. Screw it, you don’t fit in. Join Robbie and the ‘outcasts’ I kept on telling myself and yeah I did. I made my own fall down to the scrap heap and I would never look back to this day, it has been nothing but being true to me and being friends with people who actually liked me for me not my status.

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